Fiction: “No Holds Bard: Modern LGBTQ+ fiction inspired by the works of William Shakespeare”

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“Ten authors, twelve extraordinary stories. From a novel solution to the Plantagenet succession crisis to revelations about the private lives of Prince Hal and – separately! – Brutus and Cassius, plus a surprise ending for Twelfth Night, no play is safe. We have marriage proposals and murder; subtle scheming villainy; a missing manuscript; a haunting… Whether set within the framework of a play, or spotlighting actors, characters, or the Bard himself, these stories will have you viewing Shakespeare in a whole new light. It’s definitely not the kind of thing they taught us in school…

Take a deep breath. Dive in. Prepare to be astonished!”

Tag yourself, I’m ‘a novel solution to the Plantagenet succession crisis’.

Couched in a Curious Bed
Erin Horáková
Having lost his youngest son, a shaken but still-living York is determined to bring the War of the Roses to a swift end – preferably one that will benefit his family. The Lancastrian queen and heir are dead, and, medieval diplomacy being what it is, the best hope for peace lies in a highly unexpected royal marriage.

You can purchase this book here.

 

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Fiction Publication This Year

Still Out:

Rumpelstiltskin (urban fantasy, m/f erotica)
For who are so free as the sons of the waves? (historical fiction, m/m erotica, urban or high fantasy)
“she would cast him to the Wolf, the Wolf should have him” (historical fiction, m/f erotica, urban fantasy)
The Able and the Virtuous Consorts (historical fiction, f/f erotica)
Well-Fortified (historical fiction, horror, m/m erotica)
Lawful Evil (historical fiction, m/m erotica, urban fantasy)

Needs Resubmitted:

Coming Alongside (historical fiction, m/m erotica, arguably steampunkish)
If the sky holds (urban fantasy)
Senbazuru (m/m erotica)
Bunkmates (post-apocalyptic sf, m/m erotica)
Post-Production (m/m erotica)

Due to Be Published:

Couched in a Curious Bed
(historical fiction, m/genderfluid intersex erotica)
Solo Exhibition (m/f erotica, out March 8)
Rereading (f/f erotica, Owning It, out 28 March)
A Year Without the Taste of Meat (f/f romance, SF, kickstarter soon)

Out:

Bacchae (SF, out October 2017)
Too Frequent A Place (horror, historical fiction, fantasy, m/m erotica, out October 2017)
Dinner Plans (m/m erotica, out October 2017)

“Rereading”, Owning It

You can now order “Owning It”, from SinCyr Publishing, here. If you’d like a review copy, please contact the publishers here.

I’m particularly happy with “Rereading”, my story in this one. Avery is about to leave for uni, and her step-father’s paralegal Sheba thinks they should actually talk about their long-running sexual tension before she does. Contains a nasty, loaded argument about Gaudy Night and realisations about one’s sexuality by way of a very butch haircut and very femme nails.

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Fiction: Haunted

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My story “Too Frequent a Place” is out in Mugwump Press’s erotica anthology, “Haunted”.

“I underwent, as all boys do, great changes in my person as I became a man. And yet I am not certain that any other man alive changed in quite the manner I did. I expect I cannot be alone in what I am and that it would be a species of vanity to suppose so, but the fact remains that I have never met another individual with my—well, we may call them either abilities or requirements, according to the view we take of them. There again, it is not something about which one may easily enquire. “Pardon me, do you require the intimate energies of another in order to sustain yourself? Can and do you visit the dreams of others to attain such sustenance?” Such essays are neither precisely suited to the forming of new acquaintances nor likely to endear oneself to one’s accustomed friends.

aka ‘gay Victorian accidental incubus’. A little funny and a little sad. The paperback will be available from Amazon imminently, but you can order the ebook several places:

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Fiction: Bacchae

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(London Bridge Borough High St (Stop Y) by Karl Pallinger, with Google data claim)

Bethan rested her hand on the gritty surface of the wall, and Angharad winced. It almost hurt to watch Bethan lay the lush plump heart of her palm on it. The processes involved in constructing the poured-concrete building had required no element of direct human touch, and it seemed as though the wall had never been intended for it.

“Bethan! Bethan, come away, I’m dying for a piss!”

Bethan just stood there, not sober but steady in her stilettos, with one hand flat against the wall—like she was standing in front of a bloody door and didn’t know how to knock.

Read full story here, at Big Echo.

 

Foes & Families: Love & Friendship, Lady Susan, and How Jane Austen’s Victorian Family Built a Squeaky-Clean Celebrity Brand

To talk about the 2016 film Love & Friendship we have to tell the story of Lady Susan, the Jane Austen novella it’s based off of. At the time of Austen’s death, this early work was both unpublished and untitled. Thus changing the name for the film seems fair enough, though exchanging Lady Susan for Love & Friendship, already the posthumously-assigned title of an entirely different piece of Austen’s juvenilia is really confusing. The marketing team probably did it to get that familiar ‘Noun & Noun’ Austen Title Formula on the posters. According to Jane’s Fame, Claire Harman’s excellent survey of the history of Austen reception, this was already a noted, copied characteristic of her work in 1821, only four years after her death.

The exact period of Lady Susan’s composition remains a matter of some debate. William Baker’s Critical Companion to Jane Austen: A Literary Reference to Her Life and Work proposes drafting dates ranging from between 1795 to 1805, as well as providing an incredibly useful synopsis of major critical readings of the novella. What we can know definitively is that Lady Susan was first published in 1871, when it acquired its current title, by Jane’s nephew, James Edward Austen-Leigh, “as an appendix to the second edition of his A Memoir of Jane Austen”. (p. 124)

Read full review here.

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