The Strange Horizons Book Club: Hild by Nicola Griffith

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Welcome to this month’s Strange Horizons book club! This week we are discussing Hildby Nicola Griffith. Our next book will be Atlas: The Archaeology of an Imaginary City by Dung Kai-cheung, and discussions further ahead are listed here. This week we also have a bonus discussion of The Buried Giant by Kazuo Ishiguro, which you can read here.

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The Strange Horizons Film Club: Jupiter Ascending

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Welcome to this month’s book film club! a change in format this month, as Benjamin Gabriel, Erin Horáková, Ethan Robinson, and Aishwarya Subramanian have watched the both much-criticized and much-lauded Wachowski-siblings’ film Jupiter Ascending as a team. Quoth the plot synopsis, “Jupiter Jones (Mila Kunis) was born under signs that predicted future greatness, but her reality as a woman consists of cleaning other people’s houses and endless bad breaks. Caine (Channing Tatum), a genetically engineered hunter, arrives on Earth to locate her, making Jupiter finally aware of the great destiny that awaits her: Jupiter’s genetic signature marks her as the next in line for an extraordinary inheritance that could alter the balance of the cosmos.” The film was not, in the general sense, appreciated by the critical establishment, but has enjoyed a certain popularity with female audiences, and might be regarded as a nascent cult classic. We therefore bring you a selection of our lukewarm takes (they’re meant to be served room-temperature!) in a slightly unusual chat/interview format.

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The Strange Horizons Book Club: Red Shift by Alan Garner

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I edited this.

Welcome to this month’s book club! On the fourth Monday of each month, we post a round-table discussion about a speculative work (or work of interest to readers of SF), and we invite you to join us for further conversation in the comments. April’s book is Hild by Nicola Griffith and other forthcoming picks are listed here.

This month’s book is Red Shift by Alan Garner. First published in 1973, and recently reissued by the NYRB, Red Shift is one of Alan Garner‘s most celebrated novels. From the blurb: “In second-century Britain, Macey and a gang of fellow deserters from the Roman army hunt and are hunted by deadly local tribes. Fifteen centuries later, during the English Civil War, Thomas Rowley hides from the ruthless troops who have encircled his village. And in contemporary Britain, Tom, a precocious, love-struck, mentally unstable teenager, struggles to cope with the imminent departure for London of his girlfriend, Jan. [. . .] A pyrotechnical and deeply moving elaboration on themes of chance and fate, time and eternity, visionary awakening and destructive madness.”

Read full article here.

The Strange Horizons Book Club: The Buried Giant by Kazuo Ishiguro

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I edited this.

Welcome to a special edition of the Strange Horizons book club! This week we also have a discussion of Hild by Nicola Griffith, which you can read here. Our next book will be Atlas: The Archaeology of an Imaginary City by Dung Kai-cheung, and discussions further ahead are listed here.

The book we are discussing here is Kazuo Ishiguro’s new novel,The Buried Giant. From the publisher’s blurb: “The Buried Giantbegins as a couple, Axl and Beatrice, set off across a troubled land of mist and rain in the hope of finding a son they have not seen for years. They expect to face many hazards—some strange and other-worldly—but they cannot yet foresee how their journey will reveal to them dark and forgotten corners of their love for one another. Sometimes savage, often intensely moving, Kazuo Ishiguro’s first novel in a decade is about lost memories, love, revenge and war.”

Read full article here.

The Strange Horizons Book Club: The Girl in the Road

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I edited this.

Welcome to this month’s book club! On the fourth Monday of each month, we post a round-table discussion about a speculative work (or work of interest to readers of SF), and we invite you to join us for further conversation in the comments. December’s book will be Ancient, Ancient by Kiini Ibura Salaam, and other forthcoming discussions are listed here.

This month’s book is The Girl in the Road by Monica Byrne, joint winner (with Jo Walton’s My Real Children) of this year’s James Tiptree, Jr. Award. From the blurb: “In a world where global power has shifted east and revolution is brewing, two women embark on vastly different journeys—each harrowing and urgent and wholly unexpected.” From the Tiptree jury’s comments: “Through the eyes of two narrators linked by a single act of violence, the reader is brought to confront shifting ideas of gender, class, and human agency and dignity.”

Read full article here.

Yonderland

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Some reviews are straight-up celebrations: uncynical advertisements, attempts to say “Here’s something lovely, how’d it get so good?” This is one of them. Offerings like Over the Garden Wall, Steven Universe, and Yonderland suggest that we’ve rediscovered how to make excellent television that can honestly be defined as family programming, after a long, dark dearth of same: we have a good thing going here.

Full review here.